National PACE Association 20th Anniversary Video Transcript

 0:00
Narrator: In the United States, the late 60’s and early 70’s
0:03
was a time of flower power and protests…
0:05
A time of revolution and transformation…
0:08
Medicare and Medicaid were new programs…
0:10
And baby boomers started breaking tradition,
0:13
thinking differently and questioning the status quo.
0:16
Narrator: In 1971 an amazing group of pioneers led by
0:20
Doctor William Gee and Marie-Louise Ansak took what was a simple idea of a nursing home
0:25
in Chinatown and turned it into a healthcare revolution.
0:29
Marie- Louise Ansak: “I never worked with the elderly before and so I decided
0:32
to go and look at nursing homes
0:34
and I didn’t particularly like them. It’s not my style.”
0:39
“It was the time that people started to think about the elderly.
0:42
San Francisco had an awakening.
0:45
The population was aging and something needed to be done.
0:50
I guess we hit it at the right time.”
0:52
Narrator: In the spirit of these revolutionary times,
0:55
Marie-Louise realized they needed something different.
0:58
Marie – Louise Ansak: “First we needed to start
1:00
a day health center where people could come in during the day.”
1:04
“We got the day health center started on Broadway in an old burned out bar…
1:12
burned out, terrible, it looked awful!
1:15
Finally we opened that center.”
1:18
Narrator: They obtained funds to remodel the center
1:21
and train healthcare workers.
1:22
They also put together one comprehensive system of care with an interdisciplinary team.
1:28
Marie-Louise Ansak: “By then we had a small team of
1:30
social workers and nurses and a doctor
1:34
who had just graduated from medical school. He was almost a volunteer.”
1:39
Narrator: The interdisciplinary team that emerged included nursing,
1:43
social workers, doctors, dieticians, therapists and even transportation
1:47
to pick up participants for appointments and to take them to the day care center.
1:54
Judy Baskins: “The role of transportation and the drivers is frankly something
1:57
that’s near and dear to my heart.
1:58
They are a wealth of information.
2:00
They are our eyes and ears in that home environment. I just think they are phenomenal.”
2:06
Narrator: In 1973 the nation’s first adult day center
2:10
in San Francisco opens.
2:12
In honor of the rich culture in their location in Chinatown they decide to name their
2:16
newfound organization On Lok…Cantonese for Happy Home.
2:21
Narrator: Over the years On Lok continued to advance and expand…
2:25
establishing an innovative model of care and financing centered around
2:29
the needs of their participants.
2:31
This model will come to be known as the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly or PACE.
2:37
They received support from the Dept. of Health and Human Services
2:40
and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation….
2:42
PACE also enjoyed significant support from the John A. Hartford Foundation,
2:46
which has been a constant partner in its expansion throughout the country.
2:50
Once PACE proved to be a successful model of care, congress was moved to act.
2:55
Jenny Chin Hanson: “It passed into federal law and so that’s the reason now we
2:59
have a Medicare law that has been changed as a result of this program.”
3:05
Judy Baskins: “It really is about connecting with that patient and family.
3:09
It frames everything differently; from how the staff interact and the fact that this
3:16
is a long-term mutual relationship. To me that’s what sets PACE apart.”
3:22
Narrator: As On Lok sees the success of PACE,
3:25
Marie-Louise Ansak offers her blessing.
3:28
Judy Baskins: “She says, you know, you guys are just adolescents but I
3:32
really think it’s safe for you to go forth and replicate.
3:34
We taught you everything we could teach you to do
3:36
and now it’s time for On Lok to hand over to the first generation PACE
3:42
programs that passion and vision and mission to spread the word of PACE.”
3:48
Narrator: As PACE took off, more and more people noticed its advantages
3:52
and adapted it to fit their communities.
3:55
Rosemary Castillo: “As I became involved in the Area Agency on Aging
3:58
I realized that there was a huge gap in services.
4:03
People were going straight from the hospital setting to the nursing home.
4:07
So I started looking for an alternative. The decision was very easy.
4:14
Once the program was in place there was no other choice for me.
4:18
I was going with the new program.
4:21
When I found out that On Lok Senior Health Services meant
4:27
Happy Peaceful Abode it was so appropriate, it was so fitting.
4:32
Bienvivir means The Good Life, Living Well. In fact, it was a manifestation of what
4:40
we were allowing our participants to experience.”
4:45
Narrator: As PACE grew, so did the need for an association
4:48
to help federal, state and local government understand what PACE is all about.
4:54
Judy Baskins: “PACE doesn’t fit neatly in a box.
4:57
It truly is a hybrid of a provider providing healthcare and an insurer.
5:03
And because we don’t fit neatly in that box.
5:05
I think there’s a need for engagement at the regulatory level,
5:09
certainly at the federal level but also at the state.
5:12
It was one of the reasons we needed to form the association.
5:15
The National PACE Association has really been the catalyst around engagement.”
5:19
Narrator: As the association celebrates its 20th anniversary
5:22
PACE has made incredible strides expanding to over 100 programs in more than 30 states
5:28
across the country bringing sorely needed health care
5:31
and supportive services to the elderly… helping them and their families.
5:35
Jack Craddick: “We think that care should be delivered in neighborhoods
5:41
so that there is a personal care plan for every patient
5:45
that could literally be adjusted every morning.
5:49
There is somebody for the caretaker to call.
5:51
There is somebody for the home health aid to speak to.
5:55
We feel really good about the way we did it.”
5:59
Bree DeNordo: “This program is amazing
6:01
because they come, they pick
6:03
him up and he has activities
6:05
and things to do all day long.
6:07
If I had to go to a doctor or do his appointments all throughout the week,
6:12
refill the prescriptions,
6:13
I would be spending many,
6:14
many man hours doing that.
6:16
So having the ability to have it
6:18
all in one building is fantastic.”
6:21
Narrator: And today, the PACE program model has proven effective
6:24
not only in urban settings but also in the rural community.
6:28
Verna Sellers: “I think the PACE model calls for innovation
6:31
whether you’re in a rural site or an urban site.
6:37
That’s what PACE is all about, innovation.”
6:40
Narrator: New PACE leaders are innovating unique ways
6:43
to use the model in their own communities.
6:45
Craig Conner: “Something that still makes PACE special and differentiates PACE
6:49
from, say health plan, is the personalized nature of this program.
6:55
By it’s very design this program is about taking care of individual people.
7:01
I think that what has made PACE successful
7:03
and what allows Riverside as well as all the PACE programs around the country
7:06
to be successful in so many different areas, serving so many different populations
7:11
for such a relatively small model, is its ability to adapt to the local community.
7:15
Some people say that one of the things that is not attractive
7:20
about the PACE model is that it’s not a franchise model.
7:24
Each PACE center and each PACE team truly is unique
7:27
and it truly does take on the character of the community in which it serves.
7:31
And to me, though, that’s not a liability about PACE, that’s what makes PACE special.”
7:37
Narrator: Many different types of organizations make the decision
7:40
to develop PACE programs.
7:42
Mission-driven organizations like Trinity Health can adapt PACE to bring the best quality
7:47
of life to their participants.
7:49
Kelly Hopkins: “CHE Trinity Health
7:51
was formed back in May, 2013
7:54
and as we came together a new mission and vision for the two
7:58
organizations came together which is to be a transforming,
8:00
healing presence within the communities that we serve.
8:07
PACE as a service focuses on one of our major core values
8:11
which is care for the poor and vulnerable.
8:13
And we have made significant investments in providing PACE in many of our communities.”
8:22
Shawn Bloom: Forty years ago there were very few number of options in the
8:25
community that allowed the elderly to remain living at home
8:28
when they become frail and need support.
8:30
Recognizing that, a group of innovative healthcare pioneers
8:34
came together at that time to develop PACE
8:36
as we know it today.
8:37
PACE continues to attract the best and brightest healthcare leaders in this country
8:42
who are interested in finding and improving on ways to keep the elderly in the community
8:46
where they can age with dignity and respect in their homes.
8:49
Today, these leaders operate over 100 PACE programs throughout the country.
8:54
I believe the best days of PACE lie ahead.”
8:57
Narrator: Just as innovation led to the creation of PACE-
9:00
today innovation is allowing PACE programs to serve people
9:03
of all races and ethnic backgrounds…
9:06
In cities and towns that span the continuum of communities from urban to rural…
9:11
Participant: “I’m more capable of doing things.
9:14
And I have met so many people that I have fallen in love with. Everybody is so sweet.
9:21
And the people that are here are very, very, very good people, very educated.
9:26
They are very good at what they do. And that means a lot to me.”
9:31
Narrator: PACE focuses on care that improves each participants’ quality of life…
9:35
supports family caregivers…
9:37
and is able to minimize the use of hospitals, emergency rooms, and nursing homes…
9:43
Kelly: “The model is just unique.
9:45
It serves the entire social, medical needs of the individual.
9:50
It is population-health, it is person-centered.
9:54
I can’t think of another model that would meet the needs
9:58
of the participants any better than a PACE program.”
10:00
Narrator: Because of the PACE model of care, elderly people
10:03
and their families across the country are able to live happier and more fulfilled lives.
10:09
Jack Craddick: “I think that what we are able to do is give them hope
10:11
that they will have a life of dignity.
10:15
Judy Baskins: “For me, it’s not a job it’s a passion, it’s a calling.
10:21
And I think that we will continue to evolve and grow.”
10:24
Robert Edmondson: “We’ve survived for four decades and we’ll continue to survive.
10:27
It’s a bright future.”
10:29
Narrator: As the PACE community celebrates its legacy of innovation…
10:33
it is important to strive to expand the number of people served…
10:36
and to maximize the quality of each life touched by the PACE community.
10:41
♪♪